pimped up matcha latte

19th January 2018

jessica cox | pimped up matcha latte

As far as my biased opinion swings, matcha lattes are the bomb. If you follow me on Instagram you will know that I have a slight hefty obsession with matcha lattes. As someone that doesn’t drink coffee (due not to a dislike of the taste, but more to the lack of being able to tolerate it - imagine an anxious fidgety speed addict), I have found much ritualistic solace in my morning matcha. 

jessica cox | pimped up matcha latte

I did initially start with just the pure combination of matcha and milk, and still love this as a cafe option or the occasional breakfast option to compliment my brekkie. Over the past 12 months however I have kicked it up a notch to what I have endearingly called my Pimped Up Matcha Latte. 

This matcha latte version is a bit of a mini meal on its own. The cacao butter amps up the fats considerably and gives the drink a buttery flavour without using regular butter or coconut butter (I am not a fan of coconut butter. No offence coconut butter, there is nothing wrong with you, you're just not my cup of tea - there's a dad joke in that but I’m not going there). The cacao butter also has a one-of-a-kind richness that is so common to the taste of chocolate, which I personally love. I then dial up the velvety texture of the drink  and the protein content by adding in hydrolysed collagen p0wder. 

jessica cox | pimped up matcha latte

jessica cox | pimped up matcha latte

Hydrolysed collagen powder is having a moment right now. It's definitely due to its use in hot drinks (such as the very popular bullet proof coffee) and smoothies to boot. Basically it provides a variety of amino acids (though do note it contains no tryptophan and is low in isoleucine, threonine, and methionine) and also gives a fabulous creaminess to drinks. For the nutritional benefits of collagen powder read below. 

jessica cox | pimped up matcha latte

jessica cox | pimped up matcha latte

This results in a matcha latte that provides a good 13 grams protein per pimped up matcha latte serve and a hefty amount of fats for satiety. The carbs are low however and really dependent on the milk that you choose to use. For me, I like to drink my matcha about half an hour after rising (after about a billion cups of water as I am always so thirsty in the morning), then follow it with breakfast in another 1/2 or 1 hour depending on my morning. Honestly the ritual is very much flexible and dependent on the work day, exercise and what my body is telling me it needs. 

The one thing however that my body always tells me is it needs my matcha. I think I am now on par with those of you who are non-negotiable about your morning coffee. The ritual of my matcha is something I now enjoy second to none. From pouring the milk into the milk frother, to shaving the cacao butter and enjoying its own unique smell, to the spooning of the deep green matcha, it all brings me so much joy. The only thing that elevates it is taking it to bed on the weekends and reading a book while I sip away on it. Bliss. 

jessica cox | pimped up matcha latte

If you are a matcha sceptic I urge you to give this a go. I know its a bit luxurious, but if you are someone a little like me who enjoys spending their money on food instead of a pair of shoes you will have no issues in buying the ingredients to make this. While recently on our holidays I asked my hubby to pop into a health food store and buy me some more collagen as I had ran out. He was explaining to the shop assistant as she helped him find it what I do with it and her comment was 'that is very lavish'. When he told me I thought, well yep...I guess it is. But it’s my equivalent to a great block of taleggio cheese or a carton of boutique beers. What ever brings you joy I say. And dear readers, my matcha brings me all the joy in the world. 

 

pimped up matcha latte

Print Recipe
serves
serves 1
preparation time
2 minutes max
cooking time
nil

ingredients

  • 1 cup of creamy AF almond milk (or milk of choice)
  • 1 heaped teaspoon cacao butter, roughly grated with a knife (or 2 cacao butter buttons)
  • 2 super heaped teaspoons of hydrolysed collagen powder
  • 1 heaped teaspoon quality matcha (check out Instagram for my fav brand!)

method

For me this recipe is at its best made in a milk frother. I purchased my super sized one from Aldi and its the bomb. 


Place all ingredients into a milk frother and press the 'start button' and blend till all combined into a creamy and rich glorious beverage. If you do not own a milk frother simply place the ingredients into a small saucepan and bring to a very low simmer on the stove. 

Poor ideally into a double glazed glass or mug (if you are obsessed about drinks staying hot like I am) and enjoy! 

 

 

 

nutritional information

  • Hydrolysed collagen is produced from collagen, sourced from connective tissue and animal bones (nice thought right!). The process of hydrolysis breaks the collagen bonds meaning that it will not become gelatinous when adding to cold or hot beverages. Collagen is rich in amino acids glycine, lysine and proline, in particular making it extremely good for joint health, skin elasticity and nail strength along with supporting the mucosal layer of the gastrointestinal tract. Glycine in particular plays a crucial part in supporting GIT function by playing a pivotal role as a substrate on cells to facilitate cellular uptake. Glycine also plays a role in looking after the internal environment of the gut cells (called the enterocyte) and protects glutathione levels.
  • There is so much to love nutritionally about matcha! Studies show that just 2grams a day of green tea in the elderly population equates to a reduction in oxidative stress (think you could get your nan sipping on a matcha instead of her usual cup of tea?). The potent antioxidant potential of EGCG, a constituent of green tea, quenches free radicals reducing oxidative stress in the body. Studies show EGCG can reduce liver cell damage, cardiovascular mortality and has also been shown to be effective in treating hypertension and diabetes.
  • Green tea supports the GABA pathway in the brain due to its theanine content, helping to ease the effects of anxiety and stress. Green tea is also rich in chlorophyll, great for liver health and for also enhancing the secretion of secretory IgA in the gut. Secretory IgA is vital for healthy digestive function and keeping the mucosal lining of the gut wall in tip top shape.
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